UA Curry 6 Performance Review

The Under Armour Curry 6 is put through its paces with this performance review by Duke4005.

After waiting over a year for promise of HOVR cushioning to appear in the Curry line, we finally get it in the Curry 6. We all know by now about Curry’s love of court feel – does the Curry 6 keep that low, fast feel or turn into a cushy, mushy mess? Let’s go…

One of the best traction patterns I have tried in the last year. The pattern shouldn’t work – it’s flat, it’s tight, and it’s shallow. There is no herringbone, which ALMOST ALWAYS WORKS!!! So why does the Curry 6 rate so high? I have no idea, but on clean and semi-clean courts, these things stick like Gorilla. Cuts, lateral movements, starts-and-stops, coming off those “Draymond” down screens, my foot went only where I wanted it to. If dust did appear, one extremely quick wipe and I was good-to-go. That was a good thing, because dust will grab onto the outsole, especially the translucent colorway like the Christmas and Fox Theater.

Outdoors? Not. A. Chance. The soft, shallow pattern will get eaten up immediately. Indoors is doing a number on my pair, as some of the pattern is fraying off from hardwood. However, after 7 wears for game nights (roughly 28-35 full-court games), I haven’t experienced any of the peeling issues that some have had — thankfully. The cutouts in the forefoot allow for flexibility and help with transition while running (although it would be better if the foam was segmented for flexibility) but those cutouts could catch on the floor and peel. Again, mine haven’t, and I know a lot of people who haven’t experienced this yet, but it can’t be ignored.

Cushioning in a Curry? Yeah, but it’s not fluffy and puffy – its tuned for optimal impact protection while still keeping you close to the court for those crossover/step-back combo move three’s that you see Steph do and then want to try yourself. Seriously, those of you wanting the HOVR found in the Phantom or even the Sonic runner, keep looking. This foam is dense and tight but warms up the more you play, providing a solid, stable base under foot that never compresses on the edges on cuts and lateral moves. However, there was no impact issues with force coming back up the ankles and knees. The response was NOW – when you decide to move, there is no delay from the foam rebounding. For me, a bigger guard with broken knees and ankles, the Curry 6 never caused me any pain or discomfort. I wouldn’t call this HOVR magical like some of the best cushioning systems, but for quick guards that play fast and tight, it doesn’t get much better.

There’s a full knit upper with elastic areas over the top of the foot and some fuse around the high-wear areas — pretty typical for a basketball shoes today, but it works. The knit is super comfortable and not restrictive or rough at all, which truly feels like a sock on your foot. The toe area is a tighter knit with some additional backing for structure and containment but still — it’s comfy. The lacing system could have been serious — the loops are all connected until it gets to the last hole and the heel counter. If the Curry 6 would have pulled all of the cords, even around the heel with the lacing, the fit would have been killer — but more on that next. The heel interior is deeply padded and again, super-comfy. Notice a trend here? After the minimal uppers and thin padding of the Curry 4 and 5, the 6 brings the comfort strong.

The fit on the Curry 6 confused me. I saw a ton of wearers on Instagram and other sites saying the fit was perfect, but honestly, I had to double-sock to keep from having heel slip and forefoot movement. It wasn’t bad or a deal-breaker, but I don’t like to feel my foot moving inside my shoe at all, and no matter how hard I pulled, the 6 had some empty space around my foot. Again, as simple as double-socking and I was good (I did get some serious lace pressure at the top loop if I pulled way tight like I like). It was really kind of frustrating, because I had the same heel issue in the Curry 5 and the 6 had, it HAD, to be better. I gave it some break-in time for the midsole to begin softening and flexing a little smoother, and I still get slip. I think it’s because the laces pull down and not into the heel, just like the 5.

I would NOT tell anyone to stay away from the Curry 6 based on fit though. The movement was so slight it probably won’t bother a normal person, but I’m far from normal. Again, an extra sock fixed the issue for me. As for length, I had my standard thumb’s-width from the end of my big toe to the end of the toebox but if you like that real 1:1 fit, you could go down a half-size and the materials should stretch enough to stop any pain.

If anyone knows basketball, especially the NBA, then they know Steph Curry NEEDS support. The Curry 6 has sneaky support: it’s a knitted low top, but the sole is wide and the midsole is solid, meaning there is no edge compression that can lead to instability on off-balance landings (and sometimes on normal landings). The flat, wide base makes take-offs on jumpers solid and stable, which leads to better shooting. The midsole is already supportive under the arch from the HOVR but Under Armour went ahead and gave us a midfoot plate called Speedplate for additional torsional support (and I think it works with the HOVR like the FlightPlate/unlocked Zoom Combo in recent nike pg 3).

The other main factor in support and stability is side-to-side containment and the Curry 6 locks it in with a raised midsole. Your foot will sit down in the midsole so any harsh cuts and lateral movements will be stopped on the spot with the raised sidewalls.

Best Curry model ever? I can’t say that; for me, the Curry 2 is still tops (that TRACTION!!!). However, in the last 4 models, the Curry 6 is the best. A great combo of traction, cushioning and support, keeping fast players happy and non-fast players, well, still not fast, but at least they will look good. Again, the cushioning is stiff and fast but absorbs all that bad energy. If you enjoyed the Curry 2 then you need to check out the 6. If you liked the Curry 5 you should check out the Curry 6. If you liked the Curry 3, well…

Another thing — this shoe is plain fun to play in. It’s been a while since a shoe made me feel young, but the Curry 6 did. It takes a special athlete to make the public feel like them just by wearing their shoes, and at my age, I should be past all of that propaganda, but I did. It helps that I have range like Curry (Ayesha), but the fun factor always raises the score a little (new category?).

The Curry 6 is a great indicator of the future and what Under Armour can do — make a good/great performer for a nice price and it actually LOOKS good too (I liked the 4 and 5 as well, but all the internets say the 6 looks great). Much like Curry, Under Armour started out as a long shot, but the Curry 6 shows they are serious about staying around.

The Jordan Why Not Zero.2 Performance Review is here

Traction performed just as I had initially anticipated: they just gripped. Dust was never really a huge problem unless the floor at 24 Hour Fitness hadn’t been cleaned all week — yes, that actually happens at my 24 Hour Fitness. However, when the dust build up was that bad, the shoes still held its own on the floor.

I still prefer slightly larger circular patterns, like the Air Jordan 1, but if we’re just talking about what works, this is it.

The Why Not Zero.2 gripped outdoor courts just as well as they did indoor courts. However, thte rubber is on the soft side so if you were expecting a long-lasting outsole, then you may end up disappointed. While the outsole lasts, you’ll receive very good coverage but the blacktop will chew up the rubber sooner rather than later.

Forefoot Unlocked Zoom Air is in place, the same setup as the forefoot in the Air Jordan 33. The under-foot feeling is a bit different as the Phylon used between the two is not the same. Injected Phylon is what the Why Not Zero.2 midsole is made of and Injected Phylon is on the fluffy/bouncy side compared to the stuff used on the AJ33 — which may have been compression-molded Phylon and that is a much more dense foam compound.

With this model, you’ll get all the forefoot impact protection with the large volume Zoom Air unit that you did in the Air Jordan 32 and 33 but without the break-in time. Thank goodness.

The heel, despite just being Phylon, feels very comfortable and will help with minor impact. Do I miss the full-length Zoom Air setup found on the original Why Not Zero.1? Yes. I really do enjoy full-length Zoom Air, not just because it’s full-length, but because you sit a little closer to the floor. That obviously won’t be the same for all players, but my preference between the two leans towards the original setup. The Zero.2 is a little bouncier so if cushion and feedback from the cushion is your thing, then these might be exactly what you’re looking for.

Mesh and knit are found along the upper and there isn’t much to be said about it; it works. It requires zero break-in time. It’s moderately durable and it’s comfortable. Is it my first option? No, I’d have gone with a mix of textile and leather. However, for this being the new modern standard, the build gets the job done nicely.

The shoe fits true to size. I’ve been told by a friend that is wide-footed that he also went true to size, but if you happen to have a wide foot, then trying the shoe on is the best option to ensure they fit to your liking.

Lockdown, while nowhere near as awesome (suffocating) as the first model, is very good. There are overlay straps/panels in place that wrap around the foot at the forefoot, midfoot and rear. When you use textile, this is the way to enhance the experience; these areas can be customized to your specific foot shape as they’re fairly independent from the main build.

The only time I ran into any real issues with the lockdown was in the rear section of the shoe and it was only with certain socks. For whatever reason, the lining inside the shoe and some of my socks don’t get along very nicely. Once moisture is involved, things get a little slick. Luckily, the heel has an exaggerated TPU heel counter which is what really helped keep my foot onto the footbed whenever this would occur.

Support is good, but not as good as the original.

The original Why Not Zero.2 sat on a very wide flat base. These do not. This model is a bit more tipsy up front like the Air Jordan 33. It’s not something I prefer, but it is something you get used to. However, as a direct comparison, I preferred the stability on the Zero.1 much more than this setup. The Why Not Zero.2 feels like it was designed for speed whereas the original definitely wasn’t. A wider base and a more flat forefoot area, maybe an outrigger, would have been my ideal setup but I never had any issues with the shoe in terms of lateral stability so it might just be a placebo.

Midfoot and rear heel support come from the TPU plates that makeup the FlightSpeed system. These are two areas that are much better than previous renditions featuring decoupled tooling. The TPU keeps the area strong but not heavy. It also allows for some flex up front at the toe.

Again, my only real complaint is the width in the forefoot. I loved the really wide setup we had on last year’s model, but I know there were plenty that didn’t. If you were one of those players, then this setup might be the right one for you.

Overall, the Jordan Why Not Zero.2 is a badass shoe. They’re quick, comfortable, supportive where you really need it and they don’t need a ton of break-in time. The price point is perfect and the tech specs are all there. Yes, there are some things I preferred a bit more on the last model, but the Why Not Zero.2 is a shoe built for Russell Westbrook — the Why Not Zero.1 was a team model with his name put on it. It wasn’t really made for him but they made it work. These are truly Westbrook’s shoe.

If you’ve enjoyed the Air Jordan 32 and 33 but disliked the bulky feeling they had, the Why Not Zero.2 will give you what you enjoyed out of those models without the restriction.

Stanley T. With Nike Kyrie 5 Performance Review

Just before the year ends, a performance review on the Nike Kyrie 5 comes in from a bag man’s perspective.

Nike’s Kyrie 5 uses a completely different pattern than last years herringbone with some intricate designs to it. Though it’s not your typical herringbone, the multi-directional grooves gave the shoe not only a cool look, but most importantly, a functional one. No matter the change of direction or how hard I pushed the shoe, the traction was exceptional. Occasionally, you’ll need a quick wipe on those super dirty courts but on clean courts wiping the bottom of the shoe, although a habit of mine despite having good traction or not, was almost an afterthought.

The multi-directional patterns allow you to play quickly without hesitation and that’s what I prefer. While I’m not the quickest of the bunch, I do change directions often, forcing my defender off balance and by doing so, allowing myself to manipulate my stance and trust my footwork. I think quick, smaller guards or even guys who are primary ball handlers, will easily take advantage of traction this reliable. I would suggest playing with these indoor mainly. However, for those who don’t have the option or have the overseas release with the XDR rubber traction outsole, it might not last long but it’ll do the job and then some, while it lasts.

Nike utilizes the new Nike Air Zoom Turbo in the Kyrie 5. While this setup definitely gives a small nod to articulated Zoom Air of the past, it feels quite different however. For a heavy-footed person like myself, the Zoom definitely felt noticeable upon foot placement, especially heavy directional changes and planting. While the Nike Zoom Turbo isn’t overly bouncy, it does its job, especially with how the Zoom Turbo is cored into the Phylon midsole to compliment outsole design. I was really hoping for the implementation of Cushlon and Zoom Air again but this setup works. I also wouldn’t mind paying an extra $5-$10 for an additional heel Zoom Air unit.

For those anticipating major bounce-back from the ride, this isn’t it. The shoe is designed for maximum court-feel; it wasn’t a definite deal-breaker for me. However, I’d like to see Zoom Air Turbo eventually utilized in either full-length fashion or maybe in a slightly larger volume.

Engineered mesh was utilized just as it was on the Kyrie 4: the material is nice, lightweight and breaks-in rather quickly. An added nylon interior combined with the exterior mesh compliment each other so that the materials can hold well together without restriction. It would have been nice to seen some additional premium materials with the small price increase but this setup works with or without it.

SNUGGGGGGGGG! While the Kyrie 5’s predecessor, the Kyrie 4, was a little snug, the 5 really took it up a notch due to the Flytrap overlay design, which does exactly what it’s supposed to (keep you locked down). It’s definitely a shoe that everyone should try on in-store. If you can’t and have a slightly wide-foot like myself, I say go 1/2 size up to save yourself from a lack of blood flow.

This is probably one of the best locked down shoes to date. The combination of the Flytrap overlay and the structural design of the shoe, while a struggle to put on and pull off, made the foot feel extremely secure. I do love the security and lockdown provided, as long as you get the right fit.

Solid. Simple as that. It’s one of the more stable shoes released this year. While it does have a rounded outsole, the shoe was very fluid from heel-to-toe transitions but more refined. The shoe keeps you secure on the footbed, fully locked-in and has killer traction. What more can you ask for? Oh…right, more cushioning, especially what’s missing in the heel.

Hands down, one of the more fun shoes I’ve played in this year. It’s a solid overall shoe that caters to the needs of those that play a more grounded game and require unrestricted mobility. It’s the type of shoe that when someone asks you what you’re carrying around in your gym back, you tell them “THIS IS IT CHIEF!”

Again, I’ve said this repeatedly, but with the minor price increase, it’d be nice to see Nike implement a heel Zoom unit to compliment the Zoom Turbo in the forefoot. I mean, if they can do this for shoes overseas and charge the same amount, then I don’t see why not. This shoe is definitely a fun shoe that provides a smooth ride and is ready to go to war with on-court when you are ready.

Now, about that Cushlon layer into the Phylon midsole and extra Zoom in the Heel… I would love to see that on the next shoe down the line..here’s to wishful thinking.

Nike Sportswear’s “Metallic Gold” Pack Continues With Another Vapormax Flyknit 2

This Fall season, Nike Sportswear has made a concerted effort to increase the output of Metallic Gold creations. Having been previously featured on a two-piece set of shimmering Air Max 97s and an angelically-designed white Vapormax, that same revered aesthetic is back on a black version of the latter. Its focal point clearly comes by way of its monarchial midfoot Swoosh and tongue branding, while an understated flash of white arrives on its medial side as well as its insole, spicing up its otherwise black construction. Pairs have already arrived at NSW retailers around the globe, so enjoy an official set of images and use one of the links from our where to buy section below to stock up today.

 
Nike VaporMax Flyknit 2.0
$190
Color: Black/Metallic Gold-Metallic Platinum
Style Code: 942843-012

 

nikecourt zoom zero performance analysis and review

I didn’t mean for this to happen but the U.S. Open kicked off yesterday so what a perfect time to drop a tennis shoe review. I don’t review tennis shoes often because 1) I don’t play tennis often anymore 2) I already reviewed the GOAT 3) I have some Zoom Vapormax 9’s as back up.

But something about the design and look of the Zoom Zero said try me. I tried the Nike Ultra React tennis shoe a few years back as well as the Adidas Energy Boost but those two just didn’t work for me; The React was an overpriced Jordan 33 wannabe built to satisfy shoe tech geeks but guess what, nobody fell for it…Same with the Adidas Energy Boost. Have all the tech jargon you want, both shoes weren’t any better than their dumbed down counterparts.

So I bought the Zoom Zero on release day and I think I found a fantastic tennis shoe that doubles as perfect outdoor shoe as well as a great indoor Bball shoe. I guess Bo knows tennis now three decades later

*If you didn’t know I was a top junior in Texas back in the day and played a semester In college before dropping it for a life of hooping and lifting five hours a day with very occasional studying..very very occasional*

Weight

14 ounces so pretty average weight for a tennis shoe or hoops shoe.

Traction

So one of the old school benefits of Nike tennis was a 6 month outsole guarantee but the Zero doesn’t have that guarantee. Guess money is tight at Nikecourt.

The shoe features a pattern very similar to the Kd V but with smaller triangles and guess what it works ..everywhere and does what it’s supposed to do.

Tennis is a game of starting and stopping but sometimes you have to slide into shots and whatever it’s doing on court, it listened. Chase down a drop shot, split step for a volley, slide into a running forehand… it was just great.

Tennis uses similar if not the same movements as basketball so these work great outdoors as well. I took these indoors to hoop in after playing tennis the other day and they worked great although some wiping was needed on dirty floors. The point is they do what they’re supposed to.

Cushioning

Full length zoom is very rare in a tennis shoe so yes I admit this drew me in. Nike top loaded the heel and midfoot but then bottom loaded the forefoot for court feel.

Pic courtesy of Nike

I’d prefer top all the way through but it’s an interesting idea to say the least and it’s what gives the Zero such a weird looking midsole.

Heel to mid Zoom is great, nice and springy while the forefoot is pretty average with barely only some Zoom feel. I think Nike really parred down the foam to give the wearer a lower to the ground feel since it rides a little high in the heel.

The secret to the heel Zoom feel is the strobelNike used a thin foam board and cut out portions in the heel so you really get that Zoom feel.

Although I’d like more Zoom feel in the forefoot, I was very pleased with the Zoom set up overall. Quick and responsive in the forefoot with a nice bounce in the heel. I was talking to a young teaching pro and he asked me about these and said he wanted more heel cushioning to replace his Cage 2’s and I told him these would work great.

Fit

Nike likes to use a really slim and long last with their tennis shoes and these are no different. I went true to side and these fit me slightly long although it’s really the design of the toe box. I have about a thumbs width at the toe but if I went down half a size my toes would get crammed. I think most can go true to size but narrow footers may want to go down half a size. Zero heel slip out of the box which is probably due to its higher than normal cut.

It is a very Nikecourt design with an inner bootie and partial outer one piece design.

I wouldn’t say the fit is quite as good as the Vapors but it’s still a very good fit overall with no movement side to side or front to back (maybe that’s why it’s narrow at the toe, so you don’t jam our toes on stops).

Materials

Mostly mesh so nothing to write home about. For $130 it’s about what I’d expect from Nike or Adidas and it works just fine. Just can’t get cool textures with mesh.

Support and Stability

This is a tennis shoe but there the higher cut just gives it a little more support without restricting movement.

As to be expected stability is excellent thanks to a low to the ground forefoot, wide outsole and tiny outrigger. No tippiness anywhere heel to toe.

Containment

I thought these would be iffy on court but I was wrong.. No stretching on hard changes of direction or when chasing down balls sideline to sideline.

Part of the reason is the huge raised tooth coming off the midsole.

And the other is the use of synthetic and rubber around the toe.

But there is a hidden reason containment works..

There is a layer of stiff synthetic on the lateral side only to keep the mesh from stretching on hard cuts. Zero issues with containment. Well done Nikecourt, can you talk to Nike Basketball?

Durability

I usually don’t talk aboutdurability since I hoop indoors but as a chronic toe dragger when I play tennis , I wear holes in my shoes in a hurry. Nike smartly added rubber to the inside toe and medial side for durability. If you look at our shoes you rub your feet together a lot so Nike also added rubber to the medial toe area. After several hours outdoors in 100 degree heat, these are holding up nicely.

Ventilation

I usually don’t discuss this ether since I play bball indoors but playing in 100 degree weather on hard courts, my feet typically get really hot but these kept the heat at bay for me even during the middle of the day. Mesh is better than leather in this regard for sure. I’m sure there are better ventilated shoes out there but I’m not really in the market for tennis shoes like I am for bball. Still pleased with how these worked out.

Conclusion

I was looking at Asics for my next tennis shoe thanks to a lot of positive reviews from my friends and I liked how they looked but being a shoe nerd, I’m glad I gave these a shot. These are one of those shoes that you put on and forget about almost immediately. Short break in, balanced cushioning, good fit and traction..the list goes on and on with the Zoom Zero. I like my Zoom Vapors but it feels like I’m wearing a shoe on court while these just feel like an extension of my foot. I could have waited to buy these since all tennis shoes hit clearance but sometimes I’m impulsive…

A lot of readers ask about a good outdoor hoop shoe and I can’t answer that often since I don’t play outdoors but if you’re looking for a good outdoor head shoes don’t hesitate to try the Zoom Zero. It does everything a hoops shoe does well and it’s designed for the outdoors..heck, it even played great indoors. I’d actually take these over quite a few most hoops shoes.

Overall rating: first team

Well done Nike!

Air Jordan 1 Mid Features ‘Top 3’ Close Look ,Is It Better ?

Jordan Brand has had another strong year for Air Jordan 1 releases. Next up we have a new grade school pair set to launch of the Air Jordan 1 Mid that has a familiar look.

Most will notice that this pair has a similar vibe as the Air Jordan 1 ‘Top 3’ which released in 2016. Looking closer, this Air Jordan 1 Mid features Blue on the overlays, Red lands on the toe box as well as around the collar and tongue tab. We also have Black which is placed on the Nike Swoosh, Wings branding, liner, eyestays and around the toe. Finishing the look we have White on the panels and midsole.

At the time of writing, a release date for this Air Jordan 1 Mid GS has yet to be announced. However you can expect this pair to release at select Jordan Brand retailers as well as online

Air Jordan 33 Performance Review

After thirty three years of flight the Air Jordan 33 performance review is here.

The traction on the Air Jordan 33 reminded me a lot of the Nike Kobe AD NXT 360, and both patterns performed similarly. Despite being translucent rubber, the outsole of the Air Jordan 33 bit the floor nicely and, for those that care about the sound traction makes, they were loud as hell — screeching compared to everyone else in the gym. However, as we all know, sound/squeak does not equal traction.

Those that wait for a solid rubber colorway should receive slightly better grip solely based on the rubber compound, but as it stands, the Air Jordan 33 was solid. When compared to the Air Jordan 31 and 32 the 33 is the best of the bunch.

There is one area on the outsole where I’d slip semi often. It’s located at the ball of the foot and initially I thought it was just from the floor being dirty. It turns out I had the slip no matter which floor I played on so I think it’s due to the outsole’s shape in that specific spot. It’s right where the Zoom Air unit protrudes so its semi-rounded and then arches up a little.

To avoid slipping I had to change my footwork a little. Instead of putting pressure on the ball of my foot I had to make sure I was planting with most of my forefoot instead. This solved the problem and if you happen to run into the same issue it could help you out.

I would not recommend the AJ33 for anyone that plays primarily outdoors.

Cushion:Unlocked Zoom Air is back in the forefoot while the heel features a small Hex-Zoom unit, something we haven’t seen in an Air Jordan signature since the 22.

If you played in the Air Jordan 32 then you’ll receive much of the same in terms of mobility, court feel, and impact protection. The midsole is a bit stiff with the FlightSpeed plate so some breaking in is required. Once broken-in you’ll be able to maneuver across the court as you would normally with that added spring to your step. Until then, the Air Jordan 33 does feel a bit restrictive and bulky. If you can get past the initial break-in period then I think Zoom Air lovers will enjoy this shoe.

The Hex-Zoom unit at the heel went unnoticed for me. I rarely ride on my heel unless I’m trying to break/slow down. It’s there if you need it, but the primary cushion source is located up front — where I prefer it to be.

Materials: Mesh and synthetic overlays make up the upper of the Air Jordan 33 and they feel nice and light compared to the rest of the shoe. No, it isn’t premium, but it’s a very similar setup to the Jordan 32 and nobody seemed to complain about those being comprised of textile and synthetics. Why start now?

Unlike the 32, the textile here is much lighter, thinner, and more breathable. The synthetic overlays located in the forefoot gave me the feeling of wearing a regular shoe — one made the old fashioned way versus the knits and textile builds we see today. Again, it’s nothing premium but in terms of performance it all worked and worked well.

Lateral containment/support was taken care of with the panels in place as was rear coverage. Those that actually try the shoe on and wear them on-court should enjoy them the way they are.

Fit: The Air Jordan 33 fits true to size, but it’s snug width wise — something I enjoy but wide footers may not.

Lockdown is interesting. The shoe does not have laces, the standout feature on this years model, and it’s strange. I have found that I prefer laces overall; it’s easier for me to adjust each row to fit my foot the way I need rather than mess around with the pull system currently in place. However, on the flip side, untying the Air Jordan33 — if we can even call it that — is a breeze and I definitely enjoy that aspect of the new FastFit lacing system.

Does it work? Yes. It actually does. Is it perfect? No. You need to mess with things quite a bit before you find the fit that works for you. You can easily pull the shoe too tight as well — I went into detail about that in my performance teaser so check that— but I haven’t had a problem since figuring it out. Is it cool? Hell yes. It’s one of the coolest features we’ve had on an Air Jordan since being able to change the midsole cushion — plus, I get a big kick out of seeing tech.

How durable is the thin cable that is the lace? I haven’t had any issue with mine at all. I saw online that a Chinese wearer had his break on him and that may be inevitable (not every pair will be perfect). I just hope we don’t have an Air Jordan XX8 situation where many consumers like the shoe but they end up not being durable enough to last. I think we can all admit that the Air Jordan 28 is amazing, but that Zoom Air popping issue really took a toll on people.

Overall, I think the new FastFit lacing system is really neat but not necessary. I like the eject part of the system more so than the tightening portion. I’m curious to see if this system will be a one and done thing or if we’ll see it modified and enhanced next year. If the brand could improve on this current system then I think it will be onto something. If JB only uses this system on the Air Jordan 33 then I feel most will call it a gimmick that worked for some and not others.

Support: Despite being laceless, support in the Air Jordan 33 is quite nice. The overlays really help keep you on the footbed of the shoe and the FastFit system doesn’t give once taught. At the rear there is a strap system that works well and I’d love to see that on more shoes moving forward. It really emphasized how important heel lockdown is when we talk about support. It allows a closure system like this to work without being dangerous.

The midfoot torsion support is a bit too much, as mentioned earlier, because you really need to break in the FlightSpeed plate. Once it’s good then you’ll be fine, but the Air Jordan 33 is noticeably stiff compared to most other shoes currently on the market.

OverAll: The traction and cushion are both very solid in the Air Jordan 33. Materials work but the FastFit lacing system may throw some people off. There is room for improvement, but what we have is a very functional shoe that may go unappreciated…for now. In a few years I think we’ll look back and think “Man, the Air Jordan 33 was ahead of its time” — much like we do with most of the previous Air Jordans that have come before it.

People are either going to love or hate the Air Jordan 33, and such is the way of the internet. Apparently you can’t just like something anymore because if it isn’t a 10 its a 0.

I liked the Air Jordan 33 quite a bit. I’m not sure if the shoe makes it into my Top 5 of 2018, but it’ll be somewhere on my list come year’s end.

20 Things You Didn’t Know About the Nike Foamposite

When the Nike Foamposite One first dropped in 1997, it was like nothing anyone had ever seen before but people wore it in some impressive performances. The sleek $180 shoe had no Nike branding on the upper, save a small Swoosh near the toe, and the synthetic upper and prominent carbon plate gave the shoe a decidedly futuristic look, one that many sneaker designers still strive to achieve.

With interest in Foams that never ceases to fade, here are 20 Things You Didn’t Know About the Nike Foamposite.

Nobody thought it was possible.
Like all great sneaker stories, the naysayers were a plenty. The Foamposite was one of the most unbelievable designs, so it’s probabaly not a huge surprise that everyone from designers at Nike, all the way to manufacturers in China, said that it couldn’t be done when the original idea was presented.

The Foamposite was not designed for Penny Hardaway. 

Eric Avar didn’t design the Foamposite One Denim with Penny Hardaway in mind. If the apocryphal stories are true, it was originally intended for Scottie Pippen (no word on whether it then would have been called the “Foamposite 33”). But in a session with Penny, where he wasn’t moved by any of the other designs, he saw the Foamposite in Avar’s bag, and the rest was royal blue history.

It was inspired by a beetle.

 

Not the Volkswagen, but the little annoyances that wander around your garage, were actually part of the inspiration for the Foamposite’s aerodynamic features.

People thought it would ruin the footwear industry.

The design of the Foamposite was so absurd compared to the traditional usage of leather and rubber that many people actually thought Nike would ruin footwear with the design. Fast forward 15 years and now nearly everything is made out of plastic-based materials. It hasn’t seemed to keep anyone from buying sneakers yet, either.

Daewoo was the company that made it happen.

A number of companies were approached by Nike with the Foamposite concept. Many of them couldn’t come up with the correct formula to make it happen but Daewoo came through. Yep, the Korean company that makes TVs and cars were the ones behind your latest Foamposite purchase.

The upper of the Foamposite begins as liquid.

If the sleek, logoless shoe itself wasn’t enough to pry your $180 (plus tax) from your wallet, maybe the T-1000 backstory was. In order to create the Foamposite One’s seamless upper, the “foam” material started as a liquid, which was then poured into molds. How does that add up to $180? Well, the molds weren’t cheap. Read on.

The perfect temperature is between 130 and 175 degrees.

No, not to wear them. In case you were wondering, Foamposite material is created at a temperature range of 130-175 degrees Fahrenheit. If we see anyone melting down Foams on Youtube, though…

The average cost of the mold was $750,000.

$750,000 for the mold alone. Considering that doesn’t include the cost of labor, packaging, shipping or marketing, you can see why the price of the Foamposite was steep.

The midsole had to be 5 times stronger than a traditional sneaker’s.

When the Foamposite was created, the process was so different that traditional ways of manufacturing had to be revamped. In order for the molded upper to stay attached to the midsole, it had to be 5 times stronger than traditional glue and stitching. So, in a way, the development of the Foamposite helped with other future technologies just by pushing the limits.

The original price of the Foamposite One was $180.

So, this might be something you do know but there seems to be some serious confusion amongst the always knowledgable group of Internet sneaker blogs. We’re just going to clear the air, the Nike Air Foamposite One retailed for $180 when it first released and the Nike Air Foamposite Pro retailed for $170. Eastbay catalogs don’t lie, bruh.

Foamposites didn’t sell well at all.

$180 price tags may be commonplace now, but back in 1997 that was a real jump. And when you put that price tag on a brand-new technology that doesn’t even feature the usual visible cues of “high-dollar” — like a Max airbag or a Jumpman or a yeezy 350 Static — it’s gonna be a tough sell. Fortunately enough people stepped up to keep Foamposite in the line.

The NBA didn’t approve of the sneakers.

The NBA said that the colorway wasn’t fit for the court because it didn’t have enough black to coincide with Penny’s Orland Magic uniform. Penny did what any sneakerhead would do, and busted out the Sharpie to fix the problem.

Penny Hardaway didn’t debut the Foamposite One.

Mike Bibby first hit the court as an Arizona Wildcat wearing the Royal Foamposites on March 23 of 1997. That same day, Penny Hardaway laced up his Nike Air Penny IIs. It wouldn’t be until a few games later that Penny finally laced up the Foamposite One with his Orlando Magic uniform.

Penny Hardaway had white Foams 15 years before you.

Penny Hardaway may not have been the first to wear his own signature shoe in a game, and he may have never worn them in an All-Star Game or NBA Finals, but at least he was getting exclusives before anyone else. The best part is that it’s been damn near 20 years and you STILL don’t have these.

The phone number has been disconnected.

One of the shoes to be featured in Nike’s simple – and brilliant – print ad campaign that simply showed a shoe on a white background with a Swoosh and a 1-800 number, the Foamposite One never looked better. Tragically, the phone number has been disconnected. We were hoping to get Lil Penny on the line, seeing that he still owes us for the dry cleaning from his Super Bowl party.

Foamposites became the ultimate takedown model.

The Clogposite is one of the most unexpected sneakers ever created by Nike — who turns a $180 shoe into a slipper? But don’t try to front in your new camo Foams this weekend, the O.G.s been rockin’ digi camo Foams, son.

It was the first sneaker people were willing to trade their car for.

Crazy shit happens when the hype hits all time highs. This dude really tried to trade his car — with a full tank of gas, even — for Galaxy Foams. This can’t be life.

The Nike LeBron 16 “1 Thru 5” Five color way releasing

 

From a sneaker standpoint, Petrie’s been by LeBron’s side through everything from “The Decision” to his return to Cleveland to his latest decision to leave Cleveland again. Petrie has witnessed LeBron mature not only as a basketball player, but also as a person.

“Now that we have been working together for so long we can talk pretty freely,” Petrie said. “He can tell me this sucks or we can give him an idea or challenge him.”

At this stage in LeBron’s career, he’s still pushing the design team to uncharted waters as well. In this current political climate, using sneakers to also make a statement is something Petrie and LeBron are exploring and want to do more of. A game-worn pair of the LeBron 15 “Equality” is now sitting in the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture.

“That’s one of the single most amazing highlights of my career. It’s something I have never even dreamed of,” Petire said. “That’s incredible and I want to help amplify that.”

 

 

After launching last week in the elegant Harlem’s Fashion Row edition, the Nike LeBron 16 is ready to be unleashed once again in a familiar color concept that should have sneakerheads and LeBron fans in a frenzy. The “What The” styling typically refers to colorways of the past, but for the newest model, Nike Basketball is looking to the future as this release acts as a mosaic of the first five colorways of the shoe. “Fresh Bred” (the black/red), King, “SFG”, “20-20”, and “I Promise” all play a role in the composition of this audacious colorway, all while emphasizing the notion of LeBron James playing all five positions on the court. The LeBron 16 “1 Thru 5” will officially release this Saturday at select House of Hoops locations and other retailers listed below.
Nike LeBron 16 What The
Release Date: September 15th, 2018
$185
Color: Multi-color/Multi-color
Style Code: BQ6580-900
Where To Buy Air Jordan 1 GG “Hyper Pink”
House Of Hoops
In-store
Jimmy Jazz
In-store (Jamaica)

 

First Look at OBJ’s Latest Air Force 1 Collab

Nike is helping New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. and friends kick off the the new NFL season in style. With Week 1 officially in the books, Ronnie Fieg took to Instagram to show off a limited collaboration sent to him by the highest-paid wideout in the league.

The all-red Air Force 1 Low came packaged in a matching box covered in paisley print and emblazoned with OBJ’s personal logo in the center. The box also contained an envelope with a message indicating that only 100 pairs of this special collab were produced (Fieg’s was 12/100). The pair itself was covered in an array of premium materials including suede, pony hair, and ballistic mesh. Standout details include ‘X’ stitching on the seams, a paisley print liner, dubraes reading ‘1992’ in gold (Beckham Jr.’s birth year), and the remixed ‘Nike OBJ’ logo previously used on his SF AF-1 collab donning the tongue tag.

 

Nike,adidas & Jordan Release Date