Nike Sportswear’s “Metallic Gold” Pack Continues With Another Vapormax Flyknit 2

This Fall season, Nike Sportswear has made a concerted effort to increase the output of Metallic Gold creations. Having been previously featured on a two-piece set of shimmering Air Max 97s and an angelically-designed white Vapormax, that same revered aesthetic is back on a black version of the latter. Its focal point clearly comes by way of its monarchial midfoot Swoosh and tongue branding, while an understated flash of white arrives on its medial side as well as its insole, spicing up its otherwise black construction. Pairs have already arrived at NSW retailers around the globe, so enjoy an official set of images and use one of the links from our where to buy section below to stock up today.

 
Nike VaporMax Flyknit 2.0
$190
Color: Black/Metallic Gold-Metallic Platinum
Style Code: 942843-012

 

nikecourt zoom zero performance analysis and review

I didn’t mean for this to happen but the U.S. Open kicked off yesterday so what a perfect time to drop a tennis shoe review. I don’t review tennis shoes often because 1) I don’t play tennis often anymore 2) I already reviewed the GOAT 3) I have some Zoom Vapormax 9’s as back up.

But something about the design and look of the Zoom Zero said try me. I tried the Nike Ultra React tennis shoe a few years back as well as the Adidas Energy Boost but those two just didn’t work for me; The React was an overpriced Jordan 33 wannabe built to satisfy shoe tech geeks but guess what, nobody fell for it…Same with the Adidas Energy Boost. Have all the tech jargon you want, both shoes weren’t any better than their dumbed down counterparts.

So I bought the Zoom Zero on release day and I think I found a fantastic tennis shoe that doubles as perfect outdoor shoe as well as a great indoor Bball shoe. I guess Bo knows tennis now three decades later

*If you didn’t know I was a top junior in Texas back in the day and played a semester In college before dropping it for a life of hooping and lifting five hours a day with very occasional studying..very very occasional*

Weight

14 ounces so pretty average weight for a tennis shoe or hoops shoe.

Traction

So one of the old school benefits of Nike tennis was a 6 month outsole guarantee but the Zero doesn’t have that guarantee. Guess money is tight at Nikecourt.

The shoe features a pattern very similar to the Kd V but with smaller triangles and guess what it works ..everywhere and does what it’s supposed to do.

Tennis is a game of starting and stopping but sometimes you have to slide into shots and whatever it’s doing on court, it listened. Chase down a drop shot, split step for a volley, slide into a running forehand… it was just great.

Tennis uses similar if not the same movements as basketball so these work great outdoors as well. I took these indoors to hoop in after playing tennis the other day and they worked great although some wiping was needed on dirty floors. The point is they do what they’re supposed to.

Cushioning

Full length zoom is very rare in a tennis shoe so yes I admit this drew me in. Nike top loaded the heel and midfoot but then bottom loaded the forefoot for court feel.

Pic courtesy of Nike

I’d prefer top all the way through but it’s an interesting idea to say the least and it’s what gives the Zero such a weird looking midsole.

Heel to mid Zoom is great, nice and springy while the forefoot is pretty average with barely only some Zoom feel. I think Nike really parred down the foam to give the wearer a lower to the ground feel since it rides a little high in the heel.

The secret to the heel Zoom feel is the strobelNike used a thin foam board and cut out portions in the heel so you really get that Zoom feel.

Although I’d like more Zoom feel in the forefoot, I was very pleased with the Zoom set up overall. Quick and responsive in the forefoot with a nice bounce in the heel. I was talking to a young teaching pro and he asked me about these and said he wanted more heel cushioning to replace his Cage 2’s and I told him these would work great.

Fit

Nike likes to use a really slim and long last with their tennis shoes and these are no different. I went true to side and these fit me slightly long although it’s really the design of the toe box. I have about a thumbs width at the toe but if I went down half a size my toes would get crammed. I think most can go true to size but narrow footers may want to go down half a size. Zero heel slip out of the box which is probably due to its higher than normal cut.

It is a very Nikecourt design with an inner bootie and partial outer one piece design.

I wouldn’t say the fit is quite as good as the Vapors but it’s still a very good fit overall with no movement side to side or front to back (maybe that’s why it’s narrow at the toe, so you don’t jam our toes on stops).

Materials

Mostly mesh so nothing to write home about. For $130 it’s about what I’d expect from Nike or Adidas and it works just fine. Just can’t get cool textures with mesh.

Support and Stability

This is a tennis shoe but there the higher cut just gives it a little more support without restricting movement.

As to be expected stability is excellent thanks to a low to the ground forefoot, wide outsole and tiny outrigger. No tippiness anywhere heel to toe.

Containment

I thought these would be iffy on court but I was wrong.. No stretching on hard changes of direction or when chasing down balls sideline to sideline.

Part of the reason is the huge raised tooth coming off the midsole.

And the other is the use of synthetic and rubber around the toe.

But there is a hidden reason containment works..

There is a layer of stiff synthetic on the lateral side only to keep the mesh from stretching on hard cuts. Zero issues with containment. Well done Nikecourt, can you talk to Nike Basketball?

Durability

I usually don’t talk aboutdurability since I hoop indoors but as a chronic toe dragger when I play tennis , I wear holes in my shoes in a hurry. Nike smartly added rubber to the inside toe and medial side for durability. If you look at our shoes you rub your feet together a lot so Nike also added rubber to the medial toe area. After several hours outdoors in 100 degree heat, these are holding up nicely.

Ventilation

I usually don’t discuss this ether since I play bball indoors but playing in 100 degree weather on hard courts, my feet typically get really hot but these kept the heat at bay for me even during the middle of the day. Mesh is better than leather in this regard for sure. I’m sure there are better ventilated shoes out there but I’m not really in the market for tennis shoes like I am for bball. Still pleased with how these worked out.

Conclusion

I was looking at Asics for my next tennis shoe thanks to a lot of positive reviews from my friends and I liked how they looked but being a shoe nerd, I’m glad I gave these a shot. These are one of those shoes that you put on and forget about almost immediately. Short break in, balanced cushioning, good fit and traction..the list goes on and on with the Zoom Zero. I like my Zoom Vapors but it feels like I’m wearing a shoe on court while these just feel like an extension of my foot. I could have waited to buy these since all tennis shoes hit clearance but sometimes I’m impulsive…

A lot of readers ask about a good outdoor hoop shoe and I can’t answer that often since I don’t play outdoors but if you’re looking for a good outdoor head shoes don’t hesitate to try the Zoom Zero. It does everything a hoops shoe does well and it’s designed for the outdoors..heck, it even played great indoors. I’d actually take these over quite a few most hoops shoes.

Overall rating: first team

Well done Nike!

Air Jordan 1 Mid Features ‘Top 3’ Close Look ,Is It Better ?

Jordan Brand has had another strong year for Air Jordan 1 releases. Next up we have a new grade school pair set to launch of the Air Jordan 1 Mid that has a familiar look.

Most will notice that this pair has a similar vibe as the Air Jordan 1 ‘Top 3’ which released in 2016. Looking closer, this Air Jordan 1 Mid features Blue on the overlays, Red lands on the toe box as well as around the collar and tongue tab. We also have Black which is placed on the Nike Swoosh, Wings branding, liner, eyestays and around the toe. Finishing the look we have White on the panels and midsole.

At the time of writing, a release date for this Air Jordan 1 Mid GS has yet to be announced. However you can expect this pair to release at select Jordan Brand retailers as well as online

Air Jordan 33 Performance Review

After thirty three years of flight the Air Jordan 33 performance review is here.

The traction on the Air Jordan 33 reminded me a lot of the Nike Kobe AD NXT 360, and both patterns performed similarly. Despite being translucent rubber, the outsole of the Air Jordan 33 bit the floor nicely and, for those that care about the sound traction makes, they were loud as hell — screeching compared to everyone else in the gym. However, as we all know, sound/squeak does not equal traction.

Those that wait for a solid rubber colorway should receive slightly better grip solely based on the rubber compound, but as it stands, the Air Jordan 33 was solid. When compared to the Air Jordan 31 and 32 the 33 is the best of the bunch.

There is one area on the outsole where I’d slip semi often. It’s located at the ball of the foot and initially I thought it was just from the floor being dirty. It turns out I had the slip no matter which floor I played on so I think it’s due to the outsole’s shape in that specific spot. It’s right where the Zoom Air unit protrudes so its semi-rounded and then arches up a little.

To avoid slipping I had to change my footwork a little. Instead of putting pressure on the ball of my foot I had to make sure I was planting with most of my forefoot instead. This solved the problem and if you happen to run into the same issue it could help you out.

I would not recommend the AJ33 for anyone that plays primarily outdoors.

Cushion:Unlocked Zoom Air is back in the forefoot while the heel features a small Hex-Zoom unit, something we haven’t seen in an Air Jordan signature since the 22.

If you played in the Air Jordan 32 then you’ll receive much of the same in terms of mobility, court feel, and impact protection. The midsole is a bit stiff with the FlightSpeed plate so some breaking in is required. Once broken-in you’ll be able to maneuver across the court as you would normally with that added spring to your step. Until then, the Air Jordan 33 does feel a bit restrictive and bulky. If you can get past the initial break-in period then I think Zoom Air lovers will enjoy this shoe.

The Hex-Zoom unit at the heel went unnoticed for me. I rarely ride on my heel unless I’m trying to break/slow down. It’s there if you need it, but the primary cushion source is located up front — where I prefer it to be.

Materials: Mesh and synthetic overlays make up the upper of the Air Jordan 33 and they feel nice and light compared to the rest of the shoe. No, it isn’t premium, but it’s a very similar setup to the Jordan 32 and nobody seemed to complain about those being comprised of textile and synthetics. Why start now?

Unlike the 32, the textile here is much lighter, thinner, and more breathable. The synthetic overlays located in the forefoot gave me the feeling of wearing a regular shoe — one made the old fashioned way versus the knits and textile builds we see today. Again, it’s nothing premium but in terms of performance it all worked and worked well.

Lateral containment/support was taken care of with the panels in place as was rear coverage. Those that actually try the shoe on and wear them on-court should enjoy them the way they are.

Fit: The Air Jordan 33 fits true to size, but it’s snug width wise — something I enjoy but wide footers may not.

Lockdown is interesting. The shoe does not have laces, the standout feature on this years model, and it’s strange. I have found that I prefer laces overall; it’s easier for me to adjust each row to fit my foot the way I need rather than mess around with the pull system currently in place. However, on the flip side, untying the Air Jordan33 — if we can even call it that — is a breeze and I definitely enjoy that aspect of the new FastFit lacing system.

Does it work? Yes. It actually does. Is it perfect? No. You need to mess with things quite a bit before you find the fit that works for you. You can easily pull the shoe too tight as well — I went into detail about that in my performance teaser so check that— but I haven’t had a problem since figuring it out. Is it cool? Hell yes. It’s one of the coolest features we’ve had on an Air Jordan since being able to change the midsole cushion — plus, I get a big kick out of seeing tech.

How durable is the thin cable that is the lace? I haven’t had any issue with mine at all. I saw online that a Chinese wearer had his break on him and that may be inevitable (not every pair will be perfect). I just hope we don’t have an Air Jordan XX8 situation where many consumers like the shoe but they end up not being durable enough to last. I think we can all admit that the Air Jordan 28 is amazing, but that Zoom Air popping issue really took a toll on people.

Overall, I think the new FastFit lacing system is really neat but not necessary. I like the eject part of the system more so than the tightening portion. I’m curious to see if this system will be a one and done thing or if we’ll see it modified and enhanced next year. If the brand could improve on this current system then I think it will be onto something. If JB only uses this system on the Air Jordan 33 then I feel most will call it a gimmick that worked for some and not others.

Support: Despite being laceless, support in the Air Jordan 33 is quite nice. The overlays really help keep you on the footbed of the shoe and the FastFit system doesn’t give once taught. At the rear there is a strap system that works well and I’d love to see that on more shoes moving forward. It really emphasized how important heel lockdown is when we talk about support. It allows a closure system like this to work without being dangerous.

The midfoot torsion support is a bit too much, as mentioned earlier, because you really need to break in the FlightSpeed plate. Once it’s good then you’ll be fine, but the Air Jordan 33 is noticeably stiff compared to most other shoes currently on the market.

OverAll: The traction and cushion are both very solid in the Air Jordan 33. Materials work but the FastFit lacing system may throw some people off. There is room for improvement, but what we have is a very functional shoe that may go unappreciated…for now. In a few years I think we’ll look back and think “Man, the Air Jordan 33 was ahead of its time” — much like we do with most of the previous Air Jordans that have come before it.

People are either going to love or hate the Air Jordan 33, and such is the way of the internet. Apparently you can’t just like something anymore because if it isn’t a 10 its a 0.

I liked the Air Jordan 33 quite a bit. I’m not sure if the shoe makes it into my Top 5 of 2018, but it’ll be somewhere on my list come year’s end.